Sometimes, discomfort is there for good reason: it’s warning us of potential danger. However, it is also the thing that is stopping us from doing exactly the things that help us grow.

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I am baccccck. Hello. Hi. It’s been weird not being able to chat to you all this past week!

I thought I chat a little about comfort zones today – it seems fitting after the past week I’ve had!

When I was four years old my Mother was finishing up her Master’s Degree Education and while my siblings were at school, I used to stay at home with Mum. We’d begin the day reading in my parents bed, eating breakfast, followed by walking down to the beach. This wasn’t a spur of the moment decision on our account, we had this planned the day before, because I always loved to know what my day looked like. What kind of four year old needs to know this? It’s not as if I had assessments due or deadlines to meet. I purely had porridge to eat and maybe an episode(s) of Rug Rats to watch.

It wasn’t until 2013 that I realised I was still like this. Mum asked my husband, JD, “If Ally always needed to know what she was doing the day before“. When he answered “yes“, I had a little bit of a self-realisation moment. It was so interesting to realise that it’s been how I have always been. I love looking forward to things and it helps relax me knowing I have everything sorted. I don’t necessarily think that’s a bad thing, but if it’s stopping me from stepping outside of my comfort zone, it is.

Over the years I have noticed that if, for whatever reason, I am unable to know what my plans are, or if I have to wait to hear things I become extremely anxious. I wouldn’t say I am an overly anxious person, but, for some reason this is what makes me feel uncomfortable and thus, makes me feel anxious. I think there is a time and a place for discomfort.

Sometimes, discomfort is there for good reason: it’s warning us of potential danger. However, it is also the thing that is stopping us from doing exactly the things that help us grow.

Sometimes, discomfort is there for good reason: it’s warning us of potential danger. However, it is also the thing that is stopping us from doing exactly the things that help us grow. What I have learned is that if we spend all of our time just doing the things that make us feel comfortable, we’re probably missing out on a million opportunities to try new things, and so many ways in which we could improve.

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Last week JD and I moved out of our inner-city terrace and we have been house-sitting on the Northern Beaches of Sydney ahead of us traveling for a month over October/November. This is something I never dreamed of doing. I have never moved out of a house without having another lined up at least a month before. For me, that’s safety and it’s comfortable – two things that I think all of us like, if not love to feel.

I realised that house-sitting for six weeks was a unique opportunity and thought it would be a great change for both JD and I to experience. It all lined up so perfectly with our dates; so we thought “why not?”. Even though it seemed like I was “going into the unknown”, I still felt that level of comfort I always love to feel because I had sufficient notice about it. I knew it lined up perfectly with our move out date and there wasn’t much to feel uncomfortable about ahead of time. But then we got here…

The first few days being in an unfamiliar suburb and an unfamiliar house was a little bit difficult. I only have a handful of my own belongings here and everything felt a little alien. It wasn’t my kitchen. It wasn’t my bed. It was a huge step out of my comfort zone and I began to feel that familar feeling of being slightly uncomfortable.

When we feel an emotion like discomfort, it’s extremely natural to want to push it away and not think about it, but I realised quickly that I had to change my way of thinking and embrace this change otherwise the next six weeks would be so hard. To move forward I had to see the silver lining. We’re by the beach, we’re still in Sydney and we’re still able to work from here like we would’ve been doing anyway. Since changing my way of thinking and embracing this change. I haven’t been letting discomfort govern my life, which is so refreshing.

I haven’t been letting discomfort govern my life, which is so refreshing.

In closing, I highly recommend moving out of your comfort zone, as it is the key to growth. Don’t hesitate to move into the unknown. Take small steps and be honest with yourself. You can achieve a greater sense of balance if you’re open to change and accept it.

And remember: GOOD VIBES.

WEARING

WHITE T-SHIRT FROM THE ICONIC – SIMILAR BELOW

Author: Ally Carey

Hi, I am Ally, a writer and creative at Substance. I have worked in the fashion industry for 6+ years as a model and now on Substance. Substance is a lifestyle blog about fashion, beauty, health and self-improvement; hoping to inspire you to live a life filled with Substance. For more: @AllyMayCarey

1 thought on “Being out of Your Comfort Zone: Opening Up & Pushing Boundaries”

  1. Moving without knowing where you will end up is scary! We had to break our lease recently without another place in mind and I just had to make it work. It did and I couldn’t have been happier with the outcome, but that fear of the unknown is taxing!

    Where are you travelling to Ally? Exciting stuff!
    xx Jenelle
    http://www.inspiringwit.com/

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